12 Comments

  1. Shaun

    Great post! Love the insight about how the stage is set by you for those toy store meltdowns. Setting expectations and boundaries in advance is a great life skill in any situation, not just the superbowl of toy stores.

  2. Shaun

    Great post! Love the insight about how the stage is set by you for those toy store meltdowns. Setting expectations and boundaries in advance is a great life skill in any situation, not just the superbowl of toy stores.


  3. Great Article!!

    My daughter just turned 4 years old and she has a different name daily thanks to Disney world’s movies. One day shes princess, the other Mariposa, etc, etc :-)

    The truth is that yes, we have to set boundaries and usually in the beginning its tough, but at the long run it will be a good thing we did as parents.

    Regards,
    Pedro


  4. Great Article!!

    My daughter just turned 4 years old and she has a different name daily thanks to Disney world’s movies. One day shes princess, the other Mariposa, etc, etc :-)

    The truth is that yes, we have to set boundaries and usually in the beginning its tough, but at the long run it will be a good thing we did as parents.

    Regards,
    Pedro

  5. Craig Moore

    As a two time Disney vet (one with and one without kids) you got it right. Go against all you instincts. The simplest motto we had was “always go left” as people naturally go right. Use the fast pass option and yes, totally go do stuff when the big events happen. Excellent point about day two. Hit your most desired ride/attraction first thing in day, go directly there when you get in the gate. And for eating times, go anywhere between an hour to 30 mins before normal eating times to beat any rush.

    We’ll go again with all three very soon and as for the impact of commercialism on the kids and communicating that well it’s Disney, one of the best brand builders out there. You can lift the veil a little but you need to buy in a little and let them enjoy it too.

    Thanks

    Craig

  6. Craig Moore

    As a two time Disney vet (one with and one without kids) you got it right. Go against all you instincts. The simplest motto we had was “always go left” as people naturally go right. Use the fast pass option and yes, totally go do stuff when the big events happen. Excellent point about day two. Hit your most desired ride/attraction first thing in day, go directly there when you get in the gate. And for eating times, go anywhere between an hour to 30 mins before normal eating times to beat any rush.

    We’ll go again with all three very soon and as for the impact of commercialism on the kids and communicating that well it’s Disney, one of the best brand builders out there. You can lift the veil a little but you need to buy in a little and let them enjoy it too.

    Thanks

    Craig


  7. Great post! We took our 4yr old daughter a few years ago. She did great. All the walking and late nights caused a couple meltdowns but not enough to keep us all from having a great time. We’re headed back in July with our 4yr old son as well. Gonna be magical!


  8. Great post! We took our 4yr old daughter a few years ago. She did great. All the walking and late nights caused a couple meltdowns but not enough to keep us all from having a great time. We’re headed back in July with our 4yr old son as well. Gonna be magical!


  9. I had a magical Diney experience as well.  You can read about it at http://www.parentsociety.com/mom/disney-the-place-where-dreams-come-true/

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